Introducing the Cora Disc.

How to Insert
the Cora Disc

Although a disc can be intimidating for some at first, we’re confident you’ll get the hang of it quickly.

Plus, it’s a sustainable period care option–so it’s not only easy on your body, but also easy on the earth.

How to Insert
the Cora Disc

Although a disc can be intimidating for some at first, we’re confident you’ll get the hang of it quickly.

Plus, it’s a sustainable period care option–so it’s not only easy on your body, but also easy on the earth.

1. Sanitize

2. Insert

3. Tuck

4. Remove

This drawing of the menstrual disc shows the disc being sanitized in boiling water prior to use.
This drawing shows a hand squeezing the menstrual disc, showing the front of the disc.
This drawing shows the anatomy of the body and where the menstrual disc sits within the body.
This drawing shows you how to remove the menstrual disc.

1. Sanitize

This drawing of the menstrual disc shows the disc being sanitized in boiling water prior to use.

Sanitize your disc before use by boiling it in water for 5-7 minutes. Repeat this process between each cycle.

Wash your disc and hands before
and after each use.

2. Insert

This drawing shows a hand squeezing the menstrual disc, showing the front of the disc.

Squeeze the disc to form a figure 8. The finger-width groove indicates the front of your disc, which should be facing away from your body when it is inserted.

Sit, squat, or raise one leg. Guide the back rim of the disc into your vagina and push the disc back and down with your index finger towards your tailbone, as far as it will comfortably go.

3. Tuck

This drawing shows the anatomy of the body and where the menstrual disc sits within the body.

With that same index finger, tuck the front rim up and behind the pubic bone to position the disc.

If you can’t feel the disc, it is in place properly. To check the position of your disc, stand up, keeping your index finger on the rim of the disc. You can wear up to 12 hours before emptying.

4. Remove

This drawing shows you how to remove the menstrual disc.

First, relax your pelvic muscles and bear down like you are having a bowel movement. Hook your index finger under the front rim of the disc. Then, gently slide the disc out, keeping it horizontal to avoid spills.

Sanitize your disc before use by boiling it in water for 5-7 minutes. Repeat this process between each cycle.

Wash your disc and hands before
and after each use.

Squeeze the disc to form a figure 8. The finger-width groove indicates the front of your disc, which should be facing away from your body when it is inserted.

Sit, squat, or raise one leg. Guide the back rim of the disc into your vagina and push the disc back and down with your index finger towards your tailbone, as far as it will comfortably go.

With that same index finger, tuck the front rim up and behind the pubic bone to position the disc.

If you can’t feel the disc, it is in place properly. To check the position of your disc, stand up, keeping your index finger on the rim of the disc. You can wear up to 12 hours before emptying.

First, relax your pelvic muscles and bear down like you are having a bowel movement. Hook your index finger under the front rim of the disc. Then, gently slide the disc out, keeping it horizontal to avoid spills.

Tips & Tricks

This is the menstrual disc on a bathroom counter.
Auto-empty

It’s normal for some blood to empty into the toilet when you use the bathroom–this is simply the pelvic floor muscles doing their job. Ensure the disc is tucked behind your pubic bone after each trip to the restroom.

A woman in the bathtub with the menstrual disc at her side.
Easier insertion

Silicone-safe lubricant can help with the insertion process.

When you’re still getting the hang of your disc, try removing it while in the shower.

A woman doing yoga with a menstrual disc on her mat.
Take a breath

If you cannot remove your disc, don’t worry, take a break and revisit once you are more relaxed.

A woman on her bed with her menstrual cup.
Mess-free period sex

The disc's flat fit design and placement allows you to enjoy intimacy without the mess.

Two sets of hands holding Cora Applicator Tampons and the Cora Clutch.

The Cora Cup

$39

Cup Cleanse

$12 for 4 oz

Body Cloths

$12 for 18 sachets

Tips & Tricks

This is the menstrual disc on a bathroom counter.

Auto-empty

It’s normal for some blood to empty into the toilet when you use the bathroom–this is simply the pelvic floor muscles doing their job. Ensure the disc is tucked behind your pubic bone after each trip to the restroom.

A woman in the bathtub with the menstrual disc at her side.

Easier insertion

Silicone-safe lubricant can help with the insertion process. When you’re still getting the hang of your disc, try removing it while in the shower.

A woman on her bed with her menstrual cup.

Mess-free period sex

The disc's flat fit design and placement allows you to enjoy intimacy without the mess.

A woman doing yoga with a menstrual disc on her mat.

Take a breath

If you cannot remove your disc, don’t worry, take a break and revisit once you are more relaxed.

Two sets of hands holding Cora Applicator Tampons and the Cora Clutch.

The Cora Cup

$39

Cup (& Disc) Cleanse

$12 for 4 oz

Body Cloths

$12 for 18 sachets

What Cora Customers are Saying

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Read more on Blood & Milk, our editorial sister

Introducing the Cora Disc

Read More on
Blood & Milk,
our editorial sister

Introducing the Cora Disc

With every Cora purchase, we give pads to a girl who needs them.

We use the power of business to fight for gender equality and provide products, education, and jobs to girls and women in need in developing nations and right here at home.

With every Cora purchase, we give pads to a girl who needs them.

We use the power of business to fight for gender equality and provide products, education, and jobs to girls and women in need in developing nations and right here at home.